The Consent Comes First team at Ryerson University put together this rad Valentines featuring my face along with Miss Major and Stella Skinner

 I love your gender at any age!  On Valentines we often celebrate new loves, new relationships. We want to make sure that we remember than being trans is not a new idea, and that there is no “too old” or “too young” to be trans or to transition. We love your gender at any age!  Miss Major Griffin-Gracy is shining star of a trans elder. She participated in the Stonewall Riots, she was pals with Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnston, and her activism has focussed on prison justice, HIV/AIDS supports, police brutality, criminalization, sex work, and trans people. She is currently the executive director of the Trans Gender Variant Intersex Justice Project leading efforts to support incarcerated trans women, particularly trans women of colour.  RJ Jones is nakawē nêhiyaw (Saulteaux–Cree), originally from Saskatchewan and is currently living on Algonquin Territory in Ottawa, ON. They are a Two Spirit, Non-Binary and Queer multimedia artist, storyteller, facilitator and educator in the topics of decolonizing our approach to Gender and Sexuality. RJ wants to indigenize the way we see sexuality, gender and sexual & reproductive health while also decolonizing stigma.  Stella Skinner is a 9 yr old transgirl from Acton Ontario, who has been an active trans advocate for more than two years, loves spicy food and Harry Potter. She’s spoken out against conversion therapy for trans children, going to Queen’s Park to speak out about laws that will protect trans people. Stella recently spoke at the Women’s March in Toronto in January 2018 about being assaulted by a bully and what it means to be an ally to trans kids. “Be a friend, a actual friend. Sometimes we lose our whole families when we stand up for our hearts”.

I love your gender at any age!

On Valentines we often celebrate new loves, new relationships. We want to make sure that we remember than being trans is not a new idea, and that there is no “too old” or “too young” to be trans or to transition. We love your gender at any age!

Miss Major Griffin-Gracy is shining star of a trans elder. She participated in the Stonewall Riots, she was pals with Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnston, and her activism has focussed on prison justice, HIV/AIDS supports, police brutality, criminalization, sex work, and trans people. She is currently the executive director of the Trans Gender Variant Intersex Justice Project leading efforts to support incarcerated trans women, particularly trans women of colour.

RJ Jones is nakawē nêhiyaw (Saulteaux–Cree), originally from Saskatchewan and is currently living on Algonquin Territory in Ottawa, ON. They are a Two Spirit, Non-Binary and Queer multimedia artist, storyteller, facilitator and educator in the topics of decolonizing our approach to Gender and Sexuality. RJ wants to indigenize the way we see sexuality, gender and sexual & reproductive health while also decolonizing stigma.

Stella Skinner is a 9 yr old transgirl from Acton Ontario, who has been an active trans advocate for more than two years, loves spicy food and Harry Potter. She’s spoken out against conversion therapy for trans children, going to Queen’s Park to speak out about laws that will protect trans people. Stella recently spoke at the Women’s March in Toronto in January 2018 about being assaulted by a bully and what it means to be an ally to trans kids. “Be a friend, a actual friend. Sometimes we lose our whole families when we stand up for our hearts”.

Decolonizing Gender, Sexuality & Mental Health

Recently, I was asked to be a guest blogger for #SRHweek2018 with Action Canada For Sexual Health & Rights, here is the post below.

What is SRH Week?

Sexual and Reproductive Health Awareness Week (SRH Week) is an annual campaign promoting sexual and reproductive health in Canada.

Source


February 13, 2018

By: RJ Jones

How has trauma inflicted upon my people through Residential Schools and the Sixties Scoop impacted our views around gender and sexuality? How has religion changed how we view relationships? How has language extraction impacted the ways we talk about gender and sex? These are questions I ask myself when I think about why Indigenous people have disproportionately high rates of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS. Indigenous communities can also be very transphobic and homophobic, due to the impacts of colonialism and the pervasiveness of homophobia and transphobia elsewhere in society.

The biggest underlying issue that is affecting us is stigma and how that continues to impact the mental health of Indigenous people across Canada.

I am a Saulteaux-Cree First Nations person who identifies as Two Spirit, Queer and Trans. I grew up in an urbanized community, and spent a big part of my life within the Friendship Centre movement surrounded by other Indigenous people. I feel a great deal of privilege being trans and queer while growing up in an urban community because I have had a significant amount of access to resources and space to explore my identity compared to my Two Spirit & Indigenous LGBTQ+ friends in the North.

I have access to knowledge and information that has allowed me to expand my knowledge on sexuality and gender. I have had access to spaces that are affirming for my identity and I know where to meet other LGBTQ+ people. I have choices in which communities I choose to spend my time with. I know how to access Hormonal Transition Therapy and know that my transitioning costs can be covered under Indian Status. I have been able to learn and advocate more about sexuality and gender without the fear of being outed. Because of my access to my resources, I’m not afraid to be myself. Because of feeling comfortable with my identity, I am comfortable with my body and exploring and learning how to talk about sexual health. It’s also been easier for me to destigmatize my own views around sexuality and gender and to even pursue a career in sexual health. I have learned how to navigate the health system with ease because of this. I know where to go to for a routine sexual health check-up, and I wouldn’t be afraid if I was diagnosed with an STI. I know what contraception methods are available to me under Indian status and how to get Plan B for cheap. I know how to access counselling services for sexual assault, and also where and how to access an abortion if I ever need one. I have had access to a basic understanding of sexual health because of the public school curriculums I have been a part of. I think these are things that many of us take for granted.

For the past year and a half, I’ve been working alongside many different Indigenous communities to broaden their understanding of sexual health, gender and sexuality. I’ve also worked with many Indigenous youth leaders who do the same work. Storytelling and sharing circles, where participants sit in a circle to share stories without interruption, are ways that Indigenous people share knowledge with each other and have become foundational to my work. It is important for me to put time into listening to the various experiences that Indigenous people go through when it comes to sexual health, sexuality and gender. It was through this process I learned more concretely about how the violent history of colonialism has impacted many Indigenous people across Canada, and how many Indigenous people still hold stigma around sexual health, sexuality and gender. I have met many Indigenous people who have shared their stories with me and they have allowed me to share pieces of them with others for the purpose of starting these conversations.

The stories I have heard many times in multiple different ways from various people have had the same theme: ea. rom fear around coming out to their families and communities due to homophobia and transphobia, to fear of being gossiped about in a small community after being spotted by a community member at the sexual health clinic. Another person shared how an HIV/AIDs service provider breached confidentiality of a client’s HIV status, and how it impacted their life. The most dangerous part of these stories is stigma and how it silences people and results in negative mental health impacts for those experiencing these incidents.

Indigenous people who identify as Two Spirit and LGBTQ+, as well as Indigenous people post-diagnosis, are more likely to experience suicidal thoughts at some point in their lives. Conversations around sexual health, sexuality and gender can be difficult for many Indigenous people because these words have potential to hold a lot of power, and also possess a history of trauma. This is because of the legacies that systems like Residential School and the Sixties Scoop have created.

Indian Residential Schools were government-sponsored Christian-based schools to assimilate Indigenous children into European culture. Many children were forcibly taken from their families to attend and were punished for speaking their native language or practicing their culture. The educational curriculum was inadequate, and many Indigenous children were sexually abused throughout Residential School.

The Sixties Scoop was a government-run practice of forcibly taking Indigenous children throughout the sixties and placing them into foster homes and adoption. Being separated from your community, culture and language is traumatizing for Indigenous children, and we have seen the effects that these systems have created for Indigenous people currently. When Indigenous children were separated from their culture and language, they were also separated from teachings around the fluidity of gender and their roles and because many Indigenous people now strongly believe within the Christian faith, it has also stigmatized our views around sexuality. It was through these systems that talking about sexual health, sexuality and gender has become shameful to talk about, as well as traumatic.

How then do we approach the stigma of sexual health, sexuality and gender? I have learned through my work that storytelling and sharing circles are a very powerful way for Indigenous people to share their stories of misconception, pain, trauma and stigma while also reconnecting to culture. Sharing circles have potential to be healing and can take a trauma-informed approach. They are a crucial way to help Indigenous people learn and unpack the ways that we view gender and sexuality, and to help destigmatize conversations about healthy sexuality, sexual health and harm reduction. It’s through these conversations that we will begin to turn shame into resilience.